New York to Dallas by J. D. Robb

New York to Dallas by J. D. Robb
New York to Dallas by J. D. Robb (In Death, Book 33)
{link url=”http://www.fishpond.com.au/advanced_search_result.php?ref=866&&keywords=new+york+to+dallas+robb”}New York to Dallas{/link} by J. D. Robb (In Death, Book 33)

The plot brings nothing new to crime fiction. Nevertheless, this is a reasonably good thriller that should allow In Death series fans to finally get some closure on Eve Dallas’s traumatic past.

I almost didn’t finish this book. In fact, it was almost DNF before it even really began. I’ve read the first few J. D. Robb novels, and I read Patricia Cornwell’s Scarpetta series until the plot and characters went a bit WTF. So I’m not a stranger to crime fiction and the serial criminals that authors like to foist on readers.

But, for some reason, the beginning of New York to Dallas had my tummy churning. Serial child rapist Isaac McQueen was Eve Dallas’s first major arrest, and now he’s escaped prison. He’s determined to make Eve pay for putting him in prison and forces her to return to Dallas.

Readers of the series will know that Dallas is where, as a child, Eve finally escaped from her abusive father by stabbing him as he tried to rape her. Eve thinks she’s dealt with her past, but we—and husband Roarke—know this isn’t entirely true.

McQueen’s actions are calculated to discompose Eve. Because series fans know so much about Eve’s past by now, it’s not too difficult to anticipate some of the twists in the plot. Still, Robb uses these to provide Eve—and Roarke—with enough emotional conflict to keep them off-kilter.

This isn’t so much a mystery as a police chase. We know who the criminal is, and to some extent Eve tells us what his next move will be. The thrill is in how Eve will eventually bring him to justice. The way Robb arranges their final confrontation is almost a disappointment—I could see it coming from about the time Eve arrives in Dallas.

The investigation involves a task force  that includes Eve, her team in New York, the Dallas police, the FBI and Roarke’s one-man IT forensic expertise. I love Roarke as a romance hero, but his ability to buy everything and hack into everything in, like, two minutes was off-putting. I know it has to be this way so Eve won’t constantly be vulnerable outside of her job, but it’s still kind of annoying.

Robb also spends some time dealing with Eve’s fragile emotional state. Series fans will probably find that this provides some closure on Eve’s past, but I admit to skipping most of the session with Mira, her therapist and surrogate mum.

Yay or nay?

The plot brings nothing new to crime fiction. Nevertheless, this is a reasonably good thriller that should allow In Death series fans to finally get some closure on Eve Dallas’s traumatic past.

Who might enjoy it: Crime fiction readers who prefer that innocent victims survive

Who might not enjoy it: The squeamish and the paranoid

A review copy of this book was generously provided by Hachette Australia.

New York to Dallas by J. D. Robb (In Death, Book 33)New York to Dallas by J. D. Robb (In Death, Book 33) - US edition

Title: New York to Dallas (excerpt — PDF)
Series: In Death (Book 33)
Author: J. D. Robb
Publisher: Hachette Australia
Hardback: 9780749955762 (9/2011)
C format: 9780749955816 (9/2011)

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7 comments

  1. mo says:

    I glommed on these books a couple of years back. Got up to book 18 and stopped. I keep meaning to start up again but with all the other amazing books about, I wonder about Robbs ability to keep it interesting. I admit though, Roarke is one of my favourite male characters, but yes I agree, the fact that EVERYTHING is at his fingertips can get a little annoying.

  2. Kat says:

    I think I gave up after 5 or 6 books. I felt it was just more of the same—or at least, they weren’t different enough to get me to look up the rest of the backlist. I do wonder where she’ll go from here in terms of developing Eve’s character.

  3. azteclady says:

    Heh. I’m the odd one here. I’ve enjoyed most of these quite a bit. There are exceptions (I felt that two of the latest, Fantasy and Indulgence, were too similar in plot/crime/solution to previous installments, for example), but on the main I enjoy the world Ms Robb has created, the characters who populate it, and their journeys.

  4. Kat says:

    azteclady — I think romantic suspense is really just my least preferred subgenre, so that’s probably why I don’t follow this series more than anything else.

  5. azteclady says:

    I would say that while enjoying romantic suspense helps enjoy the series, some serious fans of romantic suspense don’t like these books either–because the relationships are usually much more important in them than the suspense.
     
    And, going back to your original post, I am one of those who need the good guys to win, the victims to survive (and if possible to overcome) at the end of a romantic suspense :grin:

  6. azteclady says:

    Oh no, not at all! There are couple that I really enjoyed that are very victim(s)/killer specific (Survivor in Death, Memory in Death, Divided in Death, Strangers in Death–listed in order of preference not publication, btw :grin: )

What do you think?